Electric heater

Abstract

Claims

Oct. 7, 1924. 1,510,796 C. E. PATTERSON ELECTRIC HEATER FiledOct. 9'. 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet. 1 ' Q INVENTOR 61E, IaZZersow Lad/AM ATTORNEYS Oct. 7 1924- C. E. PATTERSON ELECTRIC HEATER 2 sheets-sheer. 2 Filed Oct. 9. 1923 I IJIWIWIIIIII 1 I1 I ,m m A WWW/a2 INVENTOR 6 E JaZZer.s0n A TTORNE Y5 Patented Oct. 7, 1924. CHARLES EDWIN PATTERSON, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA. ELECTRIC HEATER. Application filed October 9, 1923. Serial No. 667,571. To all whom it may concern: Be it known that I, CHARLES EDWIN PAT- TERsoN, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Los Angeles, in the county of Los Angeles and State of California, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Electric Heaters, of which the fol lowing is a specification. This invention relates to electric heaters and has for its object the provision of a heater through which the air may freely circulate for not only heating the air of a room but for maintaining the plug which connects the heater tothe usual socket sufficiently cool to prevent injury to the plug and to the structure supporting the socket. A further object of the invention is the provision of a neat, compact and efiicient electric heater for household purposes. This invention will be best understood from a consideration of the following detailed description, in view of the accompanying drawing forming a part of the specification; nevertheless it is to be understood that the invention is not confined to the disclosure, being susceptible of such changes and modifications, which shall define no ma terial departure from the salient features of the invention as expressed in the appended claims. I I Inthe drawings Figure 1 is an elevation of my improved electric heater applied to a stand. Figure 2 is an elevation of the heater and air cooled socket forming a unitary structure. Figure 3 is a vertical section of the heater shown in Figure 2. Figure 4 is a transverse section taken along the line 4-4 of Figure 3. Figure 5 is anend view of the heater. Figure 6 is a horizontal section taken along the line 66 of Figure 3. Figure 7 is a fragmentary view of an end ofthe heater disclosing details by which the heating elements are connected to the heater. Figure 8 is a transverse horizontal section taken along the line 8-8 of Figure 3. Figure 9 is a view in elevation of a modified form of heater. 7 Figure 10 is a fragmentaryview in sectionof a stillfurther modified form of the heater. Referring more particularly to the drawings, 1 designates a rod connecting the in- -tegrallyformed spaced discs 2 and 3. The of the plug from said disc. rod and disc are formed of porcelain or some well known insulating material. The disc 3 is provided with a plurality of spaced perforations 5 as shown more particularly in Figure 4 to permitair to pass through the disc and cool the same. Disc 2 is provided with a plurality of spaced perforations 6 which are of larger diameter than the perforation of the disc 3 and likewise are for the purpose of permitting the circulation of air through the disc. Coiled resistance wires 7 are provided between the spaced discs 2 and 3 and adapted to have straight portions 8 located in slots 9 formed around the periphery of said disc. At the inner end of the slots are formed. slightly enlarged cylindrical passages 10 in which the resistance wires arelocated. One end of the resistance wire is secured in position and is electrically connected to a threaded bolt 11. The other end of the wire is connected to a threaded bolt 12. These bolts pass through perforations in the disc 3 and are spaced from each other and are secured in the inner end of plug 13. The outer end of the plug is provided with a plurality of threads embraced by a threaded metallic sleeve 14 which is adapted to be screwed into the usual lamp socket. The body of the plug 13 is formed of the same material as the rod 1 and may be made of percelain or any suitable insulating material. I Two other threaded bolts 15 and 16 are inserted through spaced perforations in the .disc 3 and are screwed into threaded passages in the lower end of the plug 13. The threaded bolts 11 and 12 are likewise screwed into the threaded passages in the inner end of the plug 13 and insulating Washers 17. surround the four bolts and engage the inner end of the plug 13 and the outer face of disc 3 and space the inner end The spacing of the inner end of the plug from the disc 3 provides for a circulation of air between the inner end of the plug and the disc. A pair of horizontal passages 18 and 19 are located at right angles to each other. are formed in the inner end of the plug 13 for providing for circulation of air to maintain the lower end of the plug cool. An electric Wire 20 located in a vertical passage in the plug 13 connects: the metallic member 14 with the threaded bolt 11. An electric wire 21 mounted in a central passage in the plug 13 connects the threaded bolt 12 with the contact member 22 mounted upon the outerend of the porcelain plug 13. A groove 23 formed in the wall of the plug 13 is adapted to receive a pin for locking a wire cage to the plug. The cage is adapted to surround the heating element to protect occupants of the household from injury. /Vhere it is desired as shown in Figure 9, straight wires 24: may be employed instead of the coiled resistance wire 7 of Figures 1, 2 and 3. In Figure 10 there is shown a slightly modified form only in the spacing insulating disc for separating the plug 13 from the disc 3 of the heater. Instead of the cylindrical member 17 discs formed of mica, asbestos or alternate discs of mica and asbestos are seated upon the disc 3 and engaged by the inner end of the plug 13 with securing bolts 11, 12, 15 and 16 passing through perforations in the discs 25 and screwed into threaded passages in the plug 13. The heads of the bolts engage the inner face of the disc 3 and lock the disc 3, insulating discs 25 and plug 13 together. Bolts 11 and 12, the bolt 11 not being shown are employed as in Figures 1 to 3, as binding posts for the ends of the resistance wire '7. The straight resistance wires may be employed in this construction where it is desired to reduce the heating capacity of the heater. Instead of screwing the plug 13 into the usual lamp socket, a stand may be provided raving a base 26 upon which is mounted a hollow standard 27 and through which the usual wires 28 for electrically connecting the socket 29 with the usual house current is inserted through the hollow standard 27. The electric wires pass through an opening 30 at the upper end of the standard and pass through an opening at the lower end of the socket 29. The upper end of the standard 27 is provided with a member 31 having a corrugated vertical face adapted to be engaged by a member 32 having a face coincidentally corrugated to the face of the member 31. A winged nut and bolt forming part of the member 31 is adapted to lock the members 31 and 32 together. The plug 13 of the heating element is screwed into the socket 29 and the stand may be placed in any suitable position within a room. What I claim is: 1. An electric heater comprising a pair of perforated spaced discs, a rod for connecting and spacing the discs, a resistance elementlocated between the spaced discs and connected to the peripheries of the discs, and a threaded plug adapted to engage a socket, means for connecting the plug to one of the discs, said means comprising spacing blocks of insulating material positioned between said discs and the end of the plug, and bolts passing through the spacing blocks for looking the plug to said discs. 2. An electric heater comprising a pair of perforated spaced discs, a rod for connecting and spacing the discs, a resistance element located between the spaced discs and connected to the periphery of the disc, and a threaded plug adapted to engage a socket, means for connecting the plug to one of the discs, said means comprising spacing blocks of insulating material positioned between said discs and the end of the plug, and bolts passing through the spacing blocks for looking the plug to said discs, said blocks being spaced in a manner to permit the free circulation of air between the plug and the adjacent disc of the heater. 3. An electric heater comprising a pair of perforated spaced discs, a rod for connecting and spacing the discs, a resistance element located between the spaced discs and connected to the periphery of the disc, and a threaded plug adapted to engage a socket, means for connecting the plug to one of the discs, said means comprising spacing blocks of insulating material positioned between said discs and the end of the plug, and bolts passing through the spacing blocks for looking the plug to said discs, said plug being provided with air passages for the circulation of air to maintain the plug cool. 4. An electric heater comprising a pair of perforated spaced discs, a rod for connecting and spacing the discs, a resistance element located between the spaced discs and connected to the periphery of the disc, and a threaded plug adapted to engage a socket, means for comiecting the plug to one of the discs, said means comprising spacing blocks of insulating material positioned between said discs and the end of the plug, and bolts passing through the spacing blocks for looking the plug to said discs, said plug being provided with transversely disposed air passages in the same plane, with one passage crossing the other passage. 5. An electric heater comprising a pair of perforated spaced discs, a rod for connecting and spacing the discs, a resistance element located between the spaced discs and connected to the periphery of the disc, and a threaded plug adapted to engage a socket, means for connecting the plug to one of the discs, said means comprising spacing blocks of insulating material positioned between said discs and the end of the plug, and bolts passing through the spacing blocks for locking the plug to said discs, said plug being provided with transversely disposed air passages in the same plane, with one passage crossing the other passage, the discs being provided with perforations to permit the free circulation of air through the discs. 6. An electric heater comprising a pair of means for connecting the plug to one of the perforated spaced discs a rod for connectdiscs, said means com rising spacin blocks 10 ing and spacing the discs, the peripheries of insulating materi positioned etween of the discs being slotted, a coiled resistance said discs and the end of the plu and bolts 5 Wire strung in spaced relation between the passing through the spacing bloc s for lockperipheries of the discs and received in the ing the plug to said discs. slots in the peri heries of the discs, and a threaded plug a apted to engage a socket, CHARLES EDWIN PATTERSON.

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    US-4066865-AJanuary 03, 1978Sperry Rand CorporationPortable hair drying appliance and heating element assembly therefor